Drivers are being warned they could face an “additional charge” with less than a year until the changes would be due to take place.

From next year, electric vehicle (EV) owners will be subject to Vehicle Excise Duty (VED), with taxes based on their cars’ emissions output.

Greg Wilson, founder and CEO of Quotezone.co.uk, said: “Any current EV driver, or motorist who is planning on purchasing a zero-emissions vehicle must ensure they are aware of the upcoming additional charges they will face.”

He added: “Currently EVs are exempt from paying VED but drivers now have less than a year to prepare for the new charges which will be coming into place from April 1, 2025.”

Wilson further stated: “These road tax charges will be affecting all current and future electric vehicle drivers.

“It’s important for anyone planning to buy a zero-emissions car to know what they will be expected to pay in less than a year’s time and factor these changes into their decision-making process.” 

Andy Wood from Tax Natives explained that anyone planning to buy a zero-emissions car should be aware of what they will be expected to pay in less than a year’s time and factor these changes into their decision-making process.

He also highlighted how the “structured approach” to taxes aims to foster sustainability and fairness by ensuring that all vehicle owners pay their equal contribution, reports Birmingham Live.

He said: “The tax system encourages responsible vehicle ownership by imposing additional charges on higher-value vehicles and aligns with broader environmental objectives.”

In a previous statement, the Department for Transport said: “Removing the VED exemption from April 2025 will marginally reduce the incentive to switch to electric vehicles, but the impact should be minimal given the marginal cost of VED compared to the overall cost of a vehicle.”

In a further response made ahead of the plans to cut petrol and diesel use in 2035, they declared: “The government has also announced the continuation of incentives for electric vehicles through company car tax, which will likely continue to be effective in incentivising EV take up, and investment in chargepoint infrastructure.”